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Life in the Public Campus: 30 minutes before class

Apart from been a blogger who rants and complains about everything, like people haven't got problems of their own, I also happen to be a student. I happen to be the not-your-average student in a Public Kenyan university. I have decided that I would be doing several of my readers a favor by occasionally blogging about aspects of campus life.

I am going to narrate a story based on a few lies and several true stories. Its up to the reader to figure out which is which. The story was penned( in a bad handwriting characteristic of a bunch of campus students) slightly more than an year ago, in a boring campus lecture. I bumped into the story in a recent boring lecture(most are even more boring than high school classes) in an exercise book which I had recycled from a previous semester. Been an environmentalist, I discovered that I had various empty exercise books left over from previous units. If you are wondering why they are empty yet I had completed the semester, I researched, and preliminary results indicated that one out of several things may have occurred, namely:-

  • The Lecturer rarely attended class
  • The student rarely attended lectures
  • The lecturer heavily relied on use of handouts hence rendering note-taking redundant
  • The student was too lazy to jot down notes
  • A combination of 2 or more of the above factors
Before you forget , we were talking of a story, which had been written in the back of a recycled exercise book and which I present to you below, in it's original form.

***
Class was supposed to start at 11, I arrived at 11.10 am. See, it's not my fault that i arrived late for class. At 10.59, I was still asleep, waking up at 11.00 a.m. At 11.01, I was my trousers and shirts simultaneously , between 11.02 and 11.04  looking for my shoes. I found one shoe at 11.03 and the other at 4 minutes pass 11. I then searched for my exercise book at 5 minutes past 11.  6 minutes past 11 found me in the washroom and my walk to class began at 11.07, eventually arriving in class at 10 minutes past 11.

As I walked into class late, I accidentally stepped on a chic as I tried to find a seat in the crowded room. Coincidentally  I happened to seat next to her.

At 11.12, I came to a conclusion that either I musty be in the wrong class, or the lecturer was plain boring. So I did the next best thing, and struck a conversation with the girl who I was now seated next to.  The topic was my lateness to the now boring lecture.

I told her how I had been dreaming at 10.48, still sleeping at 10.49 .....

She was  kind enough to advise me on how to make it to class early, and gave herself as an example. to make it in time for the 11 o' clock class, she underwent the following preparations:-

10.25 Starts calling a guy, then decides to hang up
10.26 SMS the guy above
10.28 Empties her bucket
10.30 Apply foundation for washing face
10.31 - 10.38 Goes to washroom to wash her face
10.38 - 10.42 Apply makeup
a0.43 - 10.45 Look for handbag no. 2
10.46 Empty handbag 1
10.47 Put belongings in  handbag 2
10.48 Look for phone
10.49 Start going to class
10.50 Return to room for umbrella
10.51 Finally go to class

Comments

Unknown said…
Kioko!

Man that's really creative. Whether fictional or not iko poa. Have you ever considered a full time career as a creative blogger?
The Scape 🐈 said…
thank you, full time blogger? who pays my bills?

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