Skip to main content

Unemployable Rioting University Students

Something is very wrong. Some bored students caused massive traffic snarl ups on Wednesday, the second time in as many weeks. They blocked major roads and highways within Nairobi, coupled with our impatient driving and flawed traffic control system, they brought everything to a standstill. You see, I can tell you this because it took me one and a half hours to cover the less than 500 metres between Kencom Building and Holy Family Minor Basilica, before I gave up on the journey to Yaya.

Many residents were angry, they could not move around. Furthermore, some were robbed and had their property damaged by either the same students or vagabonds who took advantage of the situation to rob them. they were visibly agitated as they swore on Twitter to never employ students from the University of Nairobi, now things were more wrong.

The employers had gotten the silver bullet to sort out the mess of our future engineers in the University going on the rampage every week, denying them employment. I guess this is supposed to be a lesson to the thousands of students in our public universities to have good behaviour.

The employers claim that there are better ways for students to demonstrate than rioting against a murder of their colleague or the disappearance of the another. I agree.

Something is wrong: people getting murdered every day and others disappearing is normal. It does not get mentioned in the news unless the police were involved and the affected family is adamant,  unless the victim is the son or the relative of a prominent employer or unless the were a public university student who spawned rioting.

On a normal day, employers are treated to news of politicians abusing each others mothers and other important things that politicians say from day to day.

On certain occasions, some employers happen to be hijacked on their way home to watch news, especially if they happen to own a second hand Toyota which might have been earlier stoned by rioting unemployable engineers. At times, the hijackings go wrong and  the employers are no longer in a state to employ as they are badly injured, several fatally injured, rendering them incapable of employing.

Luckily for most of us, the story of hijacked employees will be tucked in the inside of newspapers and better yet, unemployable engineering students will not riot to protest the death of yet another employer.

Where are the police in all this occasions?  A big number of them have been permanently seconded to guard politicians from themselves. At Several times, politicians go overboard  and hire some unemployable thugs to kill their opponents. Other times, they rally their gullible tribesmen to attack the tribe of another politician who abused their mother. Either way, police need to keep the politicians safe as the gullible tribesmen slaughter each other, like they did in Rwanda in 1994 and in Kenya in 2008.

The remaining policemen are then deployed to stand along the route that the president will take on his way to officiate some event, while the rest will be deployed along our roads and highways where they will keep them clear when our leaders politicians need to use them. For the rest of the time, they will be burdened by the traffic that results from badly managed junctions where busier roads have lower priority due to the reason that they carry long distance trucks and tax paying ordinary Kenyans rather than busy politicians.  The remaining police officers will then be left to guard the rest of the country, poorly equipped and paid. In an effort to make efforts meet, they will result to bribing just like those along our highways.

In the next elections, politicians who abuse each other mothers , others involved in honest recreational drug trade and others who do not consider employment an honest way to make a living will be voted in by both semi-educated Kenyans and unemployable engineers from their tribes.

In the universities, bright and bored students will fight out for the limited spaces. Those who are lucky enough to make it will then wait for 2 years to join ISO Certified universities for 4 , 5 or 6 year courses where they will spend half the time in more holidays.

They will also get to meet professors who might not have a clue in what they are lecturing  who might make passing of exams difficult. Furthermore, they will discover ISO certified processes might take more than twice the length of a normal process, and that ISO certified processes have the ability to audit exams they passed four years ago and turn them into failed exams. In the process, some of them might try breaking in to clubs and get killed by overzealous guards , while others will simply disappear into thin air when crossing tunnels along the most busy Highway in East Africa. The rest will become unemployable after a section of them fail to distinguish rioting from demonstrations, despite the Egyptians having demonstrated this.

Employers might have to brace themselves for further demonstrations by student engineers who will in their droves block roads engineered by Chinese technology that the students and their professors might have no clue about. Furthermore employers should brace for occasional total breakdown and anarchy where the majority of unemployed youth go on a looting spree as they try to reduce competitors from other tribes for the limited jobs with the urging of their tribal leaders politicians.

Employers are advised to mitigate their risks by rewarding students in universities that did not riot by employing a few of them and paying them salaries a fraction of their monthly university fee.

Something is wrong.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Events Surrounding March 2009 KU Riots

Following the much publicized Kenyatta University riots of Wednesday 18th March and Sunday 22nd March 2009, below are my own versions of the happenings leading to and during the riots. I have omitted several occurrences that i did not witness in first or second party. the happenings below are NOT eye witness reports, and are INADMISSIBLE legally. you can help by filling in the missing gaps, by commenting below the note.

The time frames are approximate in nature, and are issued more as checkpoints than as exact time.

Please also note that these are events, rather than causes or results of any action.

First Week of March
KUSA(Kenyatta University Student's Union) Elections

About March 16th 2009
KUSA officials meet the administration to vouch for extension of the Registration Deadline. Several students had paid after the deadline and were denied registration which was to begin on 27th March. Negotiations unsuccessful, with what transpired during the negotiations been unclear.

Tuesday 17…

A Kenyan in Addis Ababa (Part 2) - The "University Girls"

This post continues from Part 1. 

The residents of Addis are friendly too. On my first day, I did meet a guard at a hotel, who later offered to show me around. Among the places he suggested, was this place where some “University girls” were holding some "dancing ceremony". He added, that Ethiopians being Orthodox Christians, were about to go on a sex, alcohol and meat fast, hence the importance of this “ceremony.”
I had some suspicion that I was being sold to sex, but my guide insisted that this was not a sex sale. Just dancing University girls. We did end up in some nondescript compound, and into a house. There was sort of a sitting area, with a radio system, low benches and tables, and grass sprinkled around the floor. Grass sprinkled around the floor is an Ethiopian tradition that indicates you are welcome to a place.

It was about 5 PM,  and the hosts seemed not to be expecting any visitors at this time. My guide disappeared down some corridor into the back to call them. In…

Beers in Kenya: A sober opinion

I have had a short beer swigging stint in my life. It has however been long enough for me to share my opinions of Kenyan beer. Interestingly, over the course of sharing such opinions with other drunkards connoisseurs,  I have found that we all have different views as to what beer is the best, which one makes you too drunk, or which one gives a free,  extra hangover for every hangover you get from it.
For starters, like everyone else, I discovered that beer isn’t as sweet as it looks like in those adverts that show golden barley swaying in breezes,  happy men smiling and toasting chilled, foaming glasses of beer as a deep voice does some narration in the background.
Beer is bitter! Now, it turns out beer is intentionally made bitter. See,  beer shares the same ingredients as bread. The major difference is that bread isn't fermented. Bread is sweet, so why isn't beer sweet?

Why we loved Mixcrate and Where to next?

There are two types of music listeners: those who listen by artist or by album, and those who listen by top hits. The second lot of us do not care much about what other music made it to an album besides the top 2 hits.

Mixcrate served the second lot of us very well. You could search for a song title or an artist, and you would have dozens of DJ mixes to choose from which contained more than the one hit you searched for.

Listening to music on Mixcrate also meant that once you settled into a mix, you had uninterrupted music for the next one hour.

Why Kenyans love Kigali (Part 2)

See part 1 of why Kenyans Love Kigali, which this articl is a continuation.

In my previous post on why Kenyans love Kigali, or Rwanda for that matter, I had mentioned on the security of the city. The post however widely dealt with the feel and appearance of the city, and a little bit of the country.

Both of my visits to Kigali have been through the airport, though you may opt for a more adventurous journey by road. Getting to Kigali then required a Kenyan passport, but no visa. Now, all you need to go through both Uganda and Rwandan borders are a National Identity Card.

For travel by air, Rwandair is a cheaper option for Kenyans as compared to our national flag carrier, Kenya Airways. Ironically, most other Africans get to Kigali via Kenya Airways, thought most Kenyans will opt for the cheaper Rwandair. The flights are comfortable and the service on board the 1 hour 15 minutes flight is great.

Depending on the weather, your landing can be quite full of turbulence in Kigali. The airpor…