Skip to main content

Broadcast & Film Africa: Kenyan perception on Local content

I recently undertook a survey amongst my friends and subscribers to the Skunkworks and Kictanet mailing lists as to their perceptions on local content. Amongst the survey questions, were their feelings on marketing of content and additional remarks.

Below are the responses of the 40 survey respondents.

A big thanks to all those who took part.


Do you believe content producers are doing enough to market their content in Africa? Why do you say so?
  1. Currently yes, I have seen alot of facebook adverts
  2. No. No market surveys to determine how much people are actually willing to pay, no consideration for average income of the market...
  3. NO. They also know the quality needs some work.
  4. "nope - if they were, then when something hip comes out; then they wud advertise like the BoxOffice does - before popularity wanes.
  5. They shud also make it readily available thru various distribution while the content is still in demand - sadly they dont."
  6. "NO WE ARE NOT MAKING USE OF INTERNET MARKETING"
  7. there is nothing to market (thats wasting money on crap)
  8. No they aren't. Not only in marketing but also in content quality. There's a lot of mediocre content out there, and the good stuff doesn't get enough awareness advertising.
  9. They producers are doing the best they can. Most probably due to lack of proper sponsorship or funding, the quality is compromised.
  10. No. There is little to no advertising of content be it music, movies, plays, etc. Just the occasional ad in the papers.
  11. No. they lack the means to do so.
  12. No. Very few are. There is little migration of existing (past) productions into digital form. THe only television program to actively embrace digital distribution, as far as I know, is the XYZ show.
  13. No.
  14. No..There are no clear distribution of content, more so there is no enough Marketing of their products
  15. No. Content not easily accessed either physically or online.
  16. No. they operate in a very small market. They need to spread their market base and use the internet,social sites more.See the success of 'Just a Band' and Sauti Sol
  17. NO, MOST OF THE LOCAL CONTENT I HAVE HAD ACCESS TO  WAS AS A RESULT OF AVENUES OTHER THAN  MARKETING OR PROMOTION
  18. No.they are more interested in being more recognised beyond the african borders.
  19. I don't think so. Possibly they do not have sufficient funds to market their products over the cost of production. 
  20. Nope
  21. No. Distribution of locally produced media is really low. I can go into music shops and not find any local music that I like. The type of music that the youth like is hardly ever stocked in shops. The next step is online marketing if they aim to target the youth. Twitter and Facebook are so cheap to advertise on, yet so many artistes don't make use of them.
  22. "NO.
  23. minimal or no advertising. at most times they are virtually unknown.
  24. local TV media filled by foreign content."
  25. No they are not doing enough to market their contents in Africa instead they are trying so much to copy the Western styles
  26. -
  27. No, i think they need to understand that there is need for Producers , Marketers and Distributors so that market deman can be satisfied.
  28. They are not doing enough due to economic problems- they do not have money to market or outsource the marketing aspect to other players. The marketing channels are also expensive and need research to identify effective marketing communication, channels and strategies
  29. "Content providers have done taken commendable steps in the past 5 years and Kudos to them.
  30. However partnerships with Mobole operators remain few and sketchy, it is time they focused on mobile content as this is the next frontier.
  31. I believe Local contnt that is captivaring, relevant , affordable and well done will always trounce the international stuff that unfortunately we have become accostomed to."
  32. No they are not. They seem to pay too much attention on the production that they forget to market their content enough. 
  33. A crossection of content producers have taken the marketing thing to heart and are promoting the hell out of both online and offline channels. but they tend to see it as more of a numbers game than quality interaction with their consumers thus create no lasting bond.
  34. In Kenya, no, because you can see that the distribution channel isn't as wide as of that of for example Nigeria or South Africa. It is rare for a Kenyan to go into a supermarket in Nigeria and find a Kenyan digital content, but it's easy to go to a supermarket in Kenya and find a Nigerian digital content
Any additional remarks on locally produced content?
  1. They need to meet the standards we are used to internationally. Its not about the fact that its local, we need to improve on quality
  2. Consider the bottom of the pyramid, aim for volumes such that counterfeiting is not worth anyones while.. 
  3. nope
  4. THERE IS AN OPPORTUNITY IN LOCAL CONTENT
  5. some creative, more natural stuff sells itself. tv is still the same shit since we first owned a black and white tv. well there's a few exceptions like Mother in law, shuga, capital talk, etc but most stuff remains wanting especially documentaries. ever noticed how all tv stations show a one minute clock before news? maybe am the only one who gets irritated by it.
  6. "The skills are there, just not being used or people are too lazy. Instead of building a good set for a music video, artists just dance in front of a house, etc. Boring.
  7. Plus there is no originality at all."
  8. It requires marketing support.
  9. Mobile/Internet service providers should ideally support content distribution through adequate bandwidth allocation and content hosting.
  10. We have long way to go but its important not to lose originality.
  11. We have good actors,producers and creative people,all they need is to create a platform to showcase their work. Some of the editing needs work as well as the scripts etc. Keep it simple,Keep it local and it will sell.Don't be too focused on aping American or other Western culture,
  12. THEY NEED TO KILL SOME MONOTOMY TRENDS IN THEIR PRODUCTIONS, NEED TO IMPROVE ON VIDEO AND IN SOME SOUND QUALITY. OTHERWISE A GOOD EFFORT FOR BEGINERS
  13. Most of the music produced in kenya provides no relevant info which wud be worth much. The movie industry has a long way to go with professionalism lacking in great deal. 
  14. Piracy is killing the local industry. Taking a walk down river road you can buy any sort of locally produced soaps in vanacular but I'm very certain that the content owners do not make a dime from the sales.
  15. NOne
  16. Need to put some professionalism into the industry. only high quality content can gain interest from people
  17. -
  18. So far we are doing a great job, there is need for more local languages to be used.
  19. Some of the materials are poorly packaged and do not last or at times dissappoint the consumer like video and music contents packaged in poor quality
  20. we should improve on distributions channels

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Beers in Kenya: A sober opinion

Note: This is a dated post and has since been mostly passed by events. SAB Miller beers including Castle and Peroni are no longer widely available in Kenya after their exist. Sirville Brewery was bought out by Brew Bistro before being permanently shut in a tax dispute. Kenya is a land of milk, honey, beaches and taxes. I have penned, or is typed, a newer post here

I have had a short beer swigging stint in my life. It has however been long enough for me to share my opinion of Kenyan beer. Interestingly, over the course of sharing such opinions with other drunkards connoisseurs,  I have found that we all have different views as to what beer is the best, which one makes you too drunk, or which one gives one free, extra hangover for every hangover you get from it.
For starters, like everyone else, I discovered that beer isn’t as sweet as it looks like in those adverts that show golden barley swaying in breezes, happy men smiling and toasting chilled, foaming glasses of beer as a deep voi…

The bitter story of the downfall of Mumias Sugar company

Have you heard the bitter story of Mumias Sugar?

Regarded by many as Kenya's most successful sugar miller, Mumias Sugar Company was a disaster waiting to happen.

Many pointed out how Mumias Sugar Company was a fortress in the wreck that is Kenya's sugar industry, only unaware that it was just a matter of time. As the old wise men said, "Ukiona cha mwenzako cha nyolewa, tia chako maji".

The proverb means that if you see your neighbour's head getting shaved, your head will soon be undergoing the same - you'd therefore better wet your head for a smoother shave, otherwise you will be forced to undergo a painful, dry, shave.

But what ails Kenya's sugar industry?

The Kenya sugar industry is under legal siege. The typical Kenyan issue of coming up with laws to tackle a problem is evident here.

Many of Kenya's sugar factories are owned by the government, and have slowly declined under mismanagement and corruption. The appointing of political cronies and trib…

Why do people vote for Cruel Leaders?

Why do Kenyans, or any other electorate for that matter, vote for cruel politicians or so-called leaders?
The common argument is that the voters are ignorant, or were “misled” or had “no option”. But this is not true.

People know who and what they are voting for. People intentionally vote for cruel politicians especially when the voters form part of a majority - clan, tribe, race, nation, class or other majority.
It is not that they do not know the politicians are cruel. They simply assume that the cruelty will be experienced by others - the minority - and will never be experienced by them. They deal with the conscience by arguing that those experiencing cruelty must have done something wrong to deserve it.

The Bible. Why you should read your Bible.

After reading what The Candid Tin man had to say about the Bible on his blog, I felt a disappointed man. In my opinion, the candid Tin man had committed the same errors of omission and commission that have plagued the Bible for centuries.

In the beginning, the Roman Catholic church was the dominant church worldwide, and the bible existed in Latin language which common folk like me and you did not understand. Latin was a dead language used by the priests of the roman Catholic church and perhaps a few scholars.

The Roman Catholic church aimed at controlling the public's opinion , as the church still does today, and especially their opinion of what was God's word. Therefore, back then, if you needed to understand God's word, you had to consult the Roman Catholic Priests to read the Bible for youa nd then tell you what it said. How well they did this and their intentions remained questionable, with accusations directed at the Roman Catholic Church for mistranslating The Bible…

Why we loved Mixcrate and Where to next?

There are two types of music listeners: those who listen by artist or by album, and those who listen by top hits. The second lot of us do not care much about what other music made it to an album besides the top 2 hits.

Mixcrate served the second lot of us very well. You could search for a song title or an artist, and you would have dozens of DJ mixes to choose from which contained more than the one hit you searched for.

Listening to music on Mixcrate also meant that once you settled into a mix, you had uninterrupted music for the next one hour.