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Choosing your Creditors wisely

Over this week, I have learned a few lessons about lending and borrowing , of money, given that there is a lot to be lend and borrowed. Let me first of all make sure that I had not taken a break from blogging due to matters related to borrowing and lending.

Apparently, apart from carefully choosing who to lend, you should also make wise decisions as to who to borrow from. First of all, if you do not intend to return the money in a timely manner, or in this case never return it , you must devise a way of ensuring that your lender doesn't contact you in the period the money is overdue. Let us look at two case scenarios.

Situation #1, these 2 associates of mine. Associate 1 asks associate 2 to lend him some cash over a short period since his salary arrives a few days later than associates 1 salary's. Associate 1 agrees and associate 2 gets the money.

In a few days, associate 2 gets paid, and luckily looses his phone. How is this lucky, you ask? Well, associate 2 takes this opportunity to re[place his phone and his phone number. he then makes sure that he doesn't turn up at work for the next 4 days. Associate 1 cannot track associate 2 via phone nor at his workplace, and is left with a raw deal.

Situation #2, some guy on Twitter, Kenya, decided that strangers make the best people to borrow from, especially if you met them through twitter. All you need is work their charm on them, get the money and remain silent when the money is needed back, after all, they are strangers.

Well, the guy has discovered that Twitter is the wrong place to default loans. The loan issuer has kept reminding the guy that he owes her. Now all the guys twitter followers, and the public at large know that the guy had defaulted a loan, and the guy has been reminded this every hour, lest he forgets. Remember Twitter is not Facebook, where you can block your creditors from posting in your profile.

The aim of the story is that you should delete your Twitter profile if you plan to default loans to your "Tweeps."

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