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The World of Condoms!

Do you know that there is a town in France called Condom! Imagine telling someone that you are going to see a certain girl in Condom!

Ever run short of reasons for carrying a condom in difficult circumstances. Here are some perfectly accepted other uses condoms:

· Preventing a rifle barrel from clogging!

· Creating water proof microphones!

· Holding water in emergency situations

· Smuggle cocaine

· In Soviet Gulags, prisoners used condoms to smuggle up to 3 liters (diluted to make 7 liters of vodka) of concentrated vodka into prison. EABL , Trust and Kamiti Prisoners sign MOU.

· Keeping soil samples dry during soil tests

· Improvised as a one way valve by paramedics when performing chest decompressions. Why are you carrying a condom? For a medical emergency!

Animal intestines were used to make condoms around 1900!

The oldest condoms found were from 1640, discovered in Dudley Castle in England. Please check the date of manufacture on yours. It might just be one of them.

In 19th century Japan, condoms made from tortoise shells or horns and leather condoms were common. Talk about my leather being so soft.

Condoms in the early 1900s were reusable. Think of an instruction such as”Store in a cool dry place after use” or an advert that goes”the longer lasting condom!”

An “invisible condom” is under development at Universite Laval in Quebec, Canada. It is a gel that hardens upon increased temperature after insertion into the vagina or rectum. In the lab, it has been shown to effectively block HIV and herpes simplex virus. The barrier breaks down and liquefies after several hours. Talk about a tube of condom.

A spray on condom is being test-marketed by Institut fϋr kondom-βeratung( Institute for Condom Consultation) in Germany.Krause says that one of his advantages to his spray-on condom which is reported to dry in about 5 seconds, is that it is perfectly formed to each penis. Honey, did you spray?

Comments

Kenneth said…
somebody spray dis boyz head!

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