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Kibaki Government Spending Highly Focused on Infrastructure - Tool Shows

Infrastructure has seen a huge boost in the last 8 budgets. This has seen
a game of chairs especially for the defence sector.
Will Production-services be the next focus? 
The Kenyan budget has placed lots of emphasis on infrastructure, an online analysis tool shows. The Kenya Budget Explorer, a tool developed by Uwazi at  Twaweza uses an Iconomical dashboard to analyse 9 of the country's 10 last budgets (excluding the recently released 2011/2012 budget).

Of 7 spending sectors, infrastructure was at 6th position in 2002/2003 at 6.7 per cent of government spending.  To date, Social Services consisting of health , human resources (government employees) and Education (free primary education) has taken the biggest government spending at between 40 per cent and 50 per cent.

In 2002/2003, governance/economic services (provincial administration, treasury, office of the president and prime minister) came in second at 17.39 per cent of government spending while defence and security came in 3rd at 12.96 per cent.

Government spending per sector remained unmoved in 2003/2004 from the previous year.

2004/2005 saw Infrastructure jump 2 positions to the 4th position and displace production services to the second last sector.

2005/2006 saw infrastructure spending remain at the 4th position while production and services was moved a position behind at the expense of "sovereignty".

2006/2007 saw infrastructure spending displace defence and security to the 4t position as other sectors remained constant .

2007/2008 saw the positioning of the sector spending remaining the same as the previous year, though infrastructure spending was up 3 per cent.

2008/2009 saw infrastructure up to the 2nd positioning while production services displaced defence and security to the 5th position.

2009/2010 saw infrastructure spending up 3 per cent again, while defence and security and governance-economic services were switched positions to 3rd place and 5th place respectively.

2010/2011 saw infrastructure still at 2nd place with 22 per cent spending while social services had now reduced to 38 per cent. In a game of chairs, defence and security and governance-economic services switched again to previously held 5th and 3rd positions.

Infrastructure has clearly received a huge boost in Kibaki's budget, from 6.7 per cent when he came into power to 22.52 per cent in last year's budget.

You can play around with the Kenya Budget Explorer ahttp://twaweza.org/uploads/flash/budget-visualization-kenya-000/Kenya.html#/home/viewType=Bubbles&spending=PerCapita&split=Function&year=2010-11 to see how the treasury has been playing around with the various sectors in Kibaki's tenure.

The MDA's (ministry, department or agency ) section breaks the spending down further per MDA here http://twaweza.org/uploads/flash/budget-visualization-kenya-000/Kenya.html#/all-mdas/viewType=Bubbles&spending=PerCapita&split=Function&year=2010-11

You can also view the data as time or bar charts, though the bubbles give the best visualisation.



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