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China Lessons: How to catch up in innovation

In my last blog post, we learned from the Chinese how we can be entrepreneurs by making up for what nature will not adequately supply. Well, like Kenyan TV stations and their Geoecopolitical features (Geographic-economic and political) features, one feature about a certain area is not enough, and we need a series of them, case in point, Southern Sudan). In short, we are now returning to China.

We are barely halfway through the first month of this year, and barely scratched this decade, but a lot has happened, in China, that is.

The United States once thought that China, fast becoming an economic superpower, was still catching up military wise. The US military predicted that the earliest China would test a stealth plane would be the start of the next decade. Well, they were wrong, by almost a whole decade.

China in early January "secretly" tested a stealth aeroplane in a publicly viewable field.

In related news, the Americans were busy conducting naval tests in the Far East, with some of their sophisticated naval equipment. The test was highly guarded by what we journalists may report as some of the world's most sophisticated technology. An even more sophisticated Chinese submarine happened to pop out of nowhere in the midst of the many Aircraft carriers. The Chinese submarine had managed to get to the midst of the naval exercise undetected. China swears by their God that this was totally a coincidence.

In what appears to be unrelated news, the Chinese have been busy using their computers. While we were busy trying to torrent last night's episode of CSI, or playing one of those 100 in 1 movie DVDs from China, the Chinese were busy snooping on computers and ICT systems of computers in other countries.

In fact, it took several years for some companies to realize that their ICT systems had totally been compromised by hackers in China. However, we insist that the fact that increased activity on the stealth Chinese jet plane began at the same time that several sub contractors of Lockheed began been compromised , is a coincidence. Lockheed is the main contractor tasked with supplying the US Military with stealth planes. At least 6 of Lockheed's sub contractor's were reportedly completely compromised by Chinese, over several years.

You see, Chinese hackers are so complex, that even Google, a firm containing several of the world's top ICT brains took a few months to notice that its systems were also been compromised.

Lesson here is that we should put more effort in training hackers, then snoop on the US, China and other developed countries. After catching up with these, we can then put more effort in Research and Development.

I urge all Kenyans to vote for me in 2012, and we shall snoop and spy our way to a super power, economically and military prowess.

Meanwhile, I urge the Americans to continue been deeply divided over whether its Democrats or Republicans. This gives the politicians a bigger problem to worry about than a snoopy competitor thousands of miles away.

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